The Science Of Parting The Red Sea

The God breathed truth of the Bible is filled with a host of miracles that are simply inexplicable at a first glance. Some are entirely inexplicable. We trust the Word as truth because we know the power it contains: Origins, the Jewish kingdom, the prophets, the gospels, the early church, and Revelations. During the Exodus from Egypt, the tribes of Israel had fled towards the edge of the Red Sea. The Lord commanded Moses to stretch out his rod over the sea so that it would be parted to give Israel safe passage. This is phenomenon has some Christians scratching their heads and atheists saying this is why the Bible is fiction. However there is quite a bit of evidence that proves this did happen and the natural laws of physics show that it is possible.

We all have experience the vicious tendencies of nature through weather in some way whether it is hurricanes, tornadoes, or tsunamis. A great deal of the power comes from the force of wind. This is the underlying element of how the Red Sea was parted. I cite godsaidmansaid.com to give an example on the physics aspect:

A strong east wind, blowing overnight, could have swept water off a bend where an ancient river is believed to have merged with a coastal lagoon along the Mediterranean Sea, said study team member Carl Drews of the National Center for Atmospheric Research.  While archaeologists and Egyptologists have found little evidence that any events described in Exodus actually happened, the study outlines a perfect storm that could have led to the 3,000-year-old escape. “People have always been fascinated by this Exodus story, wondering if it comes from historical facts,” Drews said.  “What this study shows is that the description of the waters parting indeed has a basis in physical laws.” Drew and his colleagues used models that showed that a wind of 63 mph (101 kph), lasting for 12 hours, would have pushed back waters estimated to be 6 feet (1.8 meters) deep.  This would have exposed mud flats for four hours, creating a dry passage about 2 to 2.5 miles (3.2 to 4 kilometers) long and 3 miles (4.8 km) wide. To match the account in the Bible, the water would have to be pushed back into both the lake and the channel of the river, creating barriers of water on both sides of newly exposed mud flats, which is exactly what the models show could have happened.

What this physics model cannot provide is made up for by the mountain of evidence from the aftermath. The Egyptians pursued Israel with their chariots through the Red Sea but the water came crashing down upon them once the Jews finished crossing. After extensive exploration, archaeologists have found chariot wheels, human remains, and horse remains at the bottom of the sea. Do not trust Snopes’ fact checking on this either considering the founder is an uber anti-Semite. The video evidence is irrefutable.

Finally, one of the most irrefutable examples I give is the autopsy of the mummy claimed to be the pharaoh during this time. Here is the evidence:

 Although the internal organs had been removed during the initial mummification process, scientists were amazed to discover that massive injuries had been inflicted on this body.  The pharaoh’s body had suffered extreme violence from external blows that caused massive loss of tissue and bone in three areas: the abdomen, the thorax, and the cranium (skull).  The back also was severely damaged from a massive blow.  The remarkable violence inflicted on the pharaoh’s body was unusual because most Egyptian pharaohs died peacefully or by poison.  Yet the forensic evidence proved that this particular pharaoh had died during an incredibly violent incident, probably in water. This raises the obvious question: what could account for these injuries?  If Pharaoh Merneptah died in an onrushing of seawater, and he had been trampled by panicking horses or crushed by overturned chariots, that could account for the injuries.  As the Egyptian army pursued the escaping Hebrew slaves between walls of water in the Red Sea, the horses would have panicked as the sea suddenly rushed together again.  Certainly, the soldiers and Pharaoh would have sustained terrible injuries as they drowned.

I had no doubts about the account preceding these findings because I believe in the literal truth of the Bible. It has changed me personally in so many ways and has given me the gift of eternal life through the message of Jesus Christ. For the skeptics though, this should suffice in at least considering that there is merit to the Bible. If you seek Me, you shall find Me.

Merry Christmas everyone.

31 Comments Add yours

  1. Barbara Goldstein says:

    Isn’t proving a miracle through scientific discourse the very disproving of it as a miracle? You quote a website that claims that a gale force wind could open up the Red Sea. You cite nature and physics. But God does not work in physics or nature, if you believe the stories. In fact, I find this quasi-scientific blend to be the worst of both the scientific and the theological. For you to try and even attempt to prove it this way is an affront to the very nature of a miracle itself. In short, I believe you have done neither the scientific community nor the theological community a service here with obvious pandering. Your facts are laughably incorrect, and the need to even try and explain a miracle is terrible. For example, this “wind” that a website claims has the power to pull apart the waters claims a “mud bank.” The ancient Hebrews walked on dry land. They didn’t even get their feet wet. Your discussion is moot. If the Lord wants to part the waters, then the Lord will part the waters and not ask for physics or natural law’s permission. Furthermore, who is this being written to? You have completely alienated every audience imaginable. Christians do not believe that God works scientifically, and your atheist man made of straw does not believe that a wind can part the waters simply because they know it to be false. We are called to have faith in the Lord, not try and explain his miracles through some half baked attempt to discern the scientific causes that could have taken effect.

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    1. th3platform says:

      I’m sorry you find that so distasteful. I’m simply showing how nature does permit something like that to happen. God uses nature often. Therefore the example I cite is supplementary to the belief we have in the Bible. I think you have a shallow understanding of how God “works”. The Lord can use nature or He can defy it. The parting on the Red Sea is still a miracle because it happened at God’s will. Did God not use nature to flood the earth? Did he not use nature to plague the Egyptians with powerful storms? The rest of what I cite is simply archaeological evidence which is not offensive to the theological or scientific community. Also there is nothing wrong researching evidence for the Bible. It does not represent a lot of faith. I am faithful to the Word regardless of what evidence is and is not found.

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      1. Barbara Goldstein says:

        I think that for you to have the hubris to think you know how God works is quite the feat. None know how He works. I suppose God used nature to allow the angel of Death to come take the firstborn of every creature in Egypt? The plagues were unnatural. The parting was unnatural. That’s the point of a miracle. They mystify us. They surprise us. God does not use nature, He commands it. He tells it when to begin and when to end. Your “research” is not backed, you use shoddy references that merely explain that a wind could push up the waters of the sea. The wind could not do that. The wind would not do that. God would. If the flood were natural, then why would it need God? But for you to claim that you know the inner machinations of the I Am. That demands correction.

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      2. th3platform says:

        I think you are missing my point and taking my words out of context. Did I mention the angel of death? I mentioned the plague of torrential storms. I do not make a claim to know the entire mystery of God’s mode of operation. I’m not saying the parting was due to natural causes. God caused it to happen. I’m simply citing a supplementary explanation.

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  2. I was so excited when they found those chariot wheels, etc under the Sea! Not for proving my faith, I knew it all along! But for those “Doubting Thomas’ .”
    God is so good!! I haven’t known about the examination of the Pharaoh’s mummy. Even better!
    Merry Christmas, Lawson!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. th3platform says:

      Yes ma’am. The pharaoh autopsy is quite the finding. Thank you! Merry Christmas.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re welcome, Lawson.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. “I am faithful to the Word regardless of what evidence is and is not found”

    And by that one admission your entire ‘science’ of the red sea parting becomes moot. Can you not see that you already have an unshakeable conclusion and the ‘facts’ you quote are cherry-picked to support your pre-existing belief? – the very opposite of scientific research.

    Taking ALL the sciences we know today, including not just the physical sciences but also history, archaeology etc, an objective unbiased study consistently returns the same result – the evidence doesn’t support the story. I have to agree with Barbara on this one – It would take a miracle from God, Like most events of the early OT one must approach them as allegorical and not so factual. Unfortunately there isn’t really much evidence to conclusively prove that even the miracle happened. Chariot pieces and one autopsy do not a scientific proof make.

    Also, from memory isn’t faith “the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen”? If you are searching for validation of Gods word in science then that is kind of like the opposite of faith. Surely?

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    1. th3platform says:

      So essentially you believe this post is merely a piece of conformational bias. I can somewhat see your point but the thing is I am simply providing supplementary evidence. This is also not all the evidence that exists to support the Exodus and for the sake of time I did not list every solitary piece of archaeological evidence. I reject the notion that the Bible should be treated as allegorical. Everything in the Bible is meant to be literal truth besides parables, rhetorical truth. Again I just want to stress that there is nothing wrong with seeking evidence of God. It does not represent a lack of faith but more of a passion for understanding God. As for the soundness of “science” as a whole, I’d assume you believe evolution so I would recommend you read my post: “My final refutation”. You should not be taking scientists’ word as the gospel. Their facts are still theories my friend. Thanks for the comment.

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  4. This author has few rivals. He can make the same point as I try without drawing the haters I do. I will leave such matters to one so mush better at it than I. I post to my Facebook page and a board I have started on Pinterest writing such as this and the reactions are always positive. There are several authors That I am honored to e-blog their post. I am always very careful to give the author all the credit. Peace, Marshall

    Liked by 1 person

    1. th3platform says:

      Thank you Marshall. Merry Christmas!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Arkenaten says:

    em>After extensive exploration, archaeologists have found chariot wheels, human remains, and horse remains at the bottom of the sea. Do not trust Snopes’ fact checking on this either considering the founder is an uber anti-Semite. The video evidence is irrefutable.

    I would just like to address this point for now.

    Surely you are aware that the chariot wheel fiasco was first put forward by the late Ron Wyatt, and only Wyatt.
    He was a known fraudster who has also claimed to have found numerous other biblical relics, including at one time Noah’s ark.

    He was discredited even before his death and even fundamentalists like Kitchen and Bryant Woods think he was a charlatan
    He most certainly was not a qualified archaeologist and he fleeced a number of people of a considerable amount of money.

    You do yourself and your religion a gross disservice by promoting such spurious nonsense.

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    1. th3platform says:

      Regardless of whether or not it is true, my faith in the truth of Exodus is resilient. Also there are many other archeological aspects that support it, but I limit the amount of words I’m willing to put into a post.

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      1. Arkenaten says:

        It is true. There is no ”regardless”. You are the victim – one of a great many, for sure – of a giant ruse.

        However if you say there are other archaeological aspects could you bullet point a few?
        Just for interests’ sake, you don’t have to elaborate, I can research myself.
        Thanks.

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      2. th3platform says:

        Solomon’s pillars at the Red Sea and the Egyptian records of the plagues, particularly the death of the first born. Those are just a couple that I can think of at the moment. I’m only on my phone right now.

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      3. Arkenaten says:

        Again, the pillars have been explained. And surely you are aware these are another of Wyatt’s nonsense?
        Please tell you have at least done a modicum of research on this despicable man?

        I presume you are aware of the document the supposed plagues interpretation was taken from?
        And the complete lack of archaeological evidence for the Exodus account?
        Do you require a link?

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      4. th3platform says:

        Sure send me your links.

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  6. Hi! I found your blog via Danny at Dream Big, Dream Often. I look forward to reading your posts.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. lptrey says:

      Thank you ma’am. Pleased to meet you! Get ready for more powerful content to come!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. if the wind was powerful enough to open up the Red Sea… Then why exactly weren’t the Israelite’s blown away by the force of the wind? Even the women apparently got through. Oops.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. lptrey says:

      This is merely a possible explanation. We have no way of knowing for sure if wind was used. However, to entertain your point, its like asking how did Noah’s ark not drown like everything else? How did Peter walk on water? The Lord defied the laws of nature to save his people and whatever means he used to allow them passage through the Red Sea, was a means that didn’t blow them away.

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      1. The point I’m making is that 1) there’s not a figment of evidence for the skeptics hypothesis that the splitting of the sea was not caused by God, but rather some wind and 2) this claim is incoherent because the Israelite’s and Egyptians would have been blown to oblivion by such winds.

        By the way, thanks for checking out my blog. I didn’t ask but a thanks anyways!

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      2. lptrey says:

        This post was not meant to undermine God’s ability to part the Red Sea. I’m just saying that so many people think that it is 100% impossible that something like this could happen, but yet experiments have shown that a consistent force of wind can produce the sort of pathway described. I’m only showing that it is possible! Whether or not God used the wind is completely speculation. I enjoy your posts! I may reblog a few of them actually. Continue your work please. Feel free to check out some of my posts in the most popular tab. God bless you.

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      3. Thanks and God bless you as well. I find countless problems with the people who reject that it is “impossible” for the sea to be split, that requires presupposing that the supernatural doesn’t exist which is a fundamentally ridiculous. But I see your point. Thanks for considering reblogging some of my stuff. I’ll definitely check out some of your posts as well.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Hello again brother — just wanted to ask, do you have any posts on the Exodus aside from this one?

        Liked by 1 person

      5. lptrey says:

        I do not my friend! What else have you researched on it?

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      6. As of now, I’ve written a blog on the historical evidence for the exodus — but I’m still editing it. It’s about midway complete. I did not know the number of hours of research I’d need before I started the project, but I’ve found many scholarly resources as well as an archaeological organization that has aided me quite the bit.

        You can check out the post I have on the exodus so far if you want, I’ve gotten very good feedback so far. But you shouldn’t share it until I have completed it.

        Liked by 1 person

      7. lptrey says:

        I will very soon! Good work my friend.

        Liked by 1 person

      8. Thanks. Blessings to you and your family.

        Liked by 1 person

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